Shannon & the Clams

The First Annual Tenth Anniversary Extravaganza Night 2

Shannon & the Clams

IAN SWEET, Dick Stusso, Guest MC - Seth Bogart

Fri ยท May 19, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$18.00 - $20.00

This event is 21 and over

Shannon & the Clams
Shannon & the Clams
The American West. America's America. It was here in three very different worlds that Shannon and the Clams were spawned. From the dark redwood forests of Oregon emerged Cody Blanchard: singer and guitarist. The dusty walnut orchards and vineyards of northern California gave us Shannon Shaw: singer and bassist. Out of the lonely dunes of California's central coast shambled Nate Mayhem: drummer and keys. These three talented visual artists were drawn separately to Oakland, California and it was there that the Clams began playing house parties and grimy clubs.

The band was forged in the anachronistic remote communities of the west, in some strange mixture of computer show and country fair; their music is some odd alloy of The Last Picture Show and The Decline of Western Civilization. The pioneer spirit of western life is all over this band: pushing into the unknown, blazing their own trail, creating their own destiny, with the accompanying canyon-esque loneliness and untamed joy only truly known by those with the courage to pull up stakes and head off into the big empty sunset.

Gone by the Dawn, the newest Shannon and the Clams album, is their best work to date. The music is complex, the lyrical content is emotionally raw and honest, and the production is the strangest it's ever been. The album was written as one member was recovering from a serious breakup and another was deep in one. The lyrics reflect it, and the entire album is dripping with sadness, pain, and introspection. Shannon and Cody have not written generic songs about love or the lack of it. Instead they have written about their very own specific heartbreak, mistreatment, and mental trials. The emotion is palpable. On Gone by the Dawn the Clams have DARED TO BE REAL. They've exposed their true emotions, which is what's most moving about the album. People are scared to be so real. Society does not encourage it. Folks remain guarded to protect themselves from being mocked, punished, and becoming outcast . The Clams have opted to forgo the potential tongue-clucking finger-waggers, and have instead had the artistic courage and audacity to splay their pain and struggles out for all to hear. We are lucky to hear them get so damn real.

For Gone by the Dawn, the Oakland trio hooked up with studio wizard and renaissance-man Sonny Smith to record the album at Tiny Telephone Recording in San Francisco. Best known as the driving force behind San Francisco's beloved Sonny and the Sunsets, Smith uses his refreshing production techniques to create an engaging sonic landscape without compromising the Clams' signature Lou Christie-meets-The Circle Jerks sound. The Clams have evolved: their skills are sharper, their chops are tighter and weirder and they've added new instruments to to the mix. A whole new dimension of the Clams has emerged.

Nowadays, it's exceedingly rare for a two-and-half minute rock song to have raw emotional power, but with Gone by the Dawn Shannon and the Clams have gifted us an entire album of them.

-Dan Shaw
IAN SWEET
IAN SWEET
"I have a way of loving too many things to take on just one shape," Jilian Medford sings over and over again on the title track of the Brooklyn-based band IAN SWEET's debut album, Shapeshifter, repeating it like a mantra. This is Medford's thesis statement, a narrator to carry us through Shapeshifter, which is above all else a meditation on loneliness and displacement. It's about losing love and your sense of self in the process, about grabbing at the little things in life that bring joy when nothing else is going according to plan. It's also an ode to the bandmates, and the friends, that see you through.
IAN SWEET started in 2014 with a string of text messages. Medford was a few days away from embarking on her first tour when the driver and drummer she recruited cancelled. Medford sent IAN SWEET drummer Tim Cheney -- whom she barely knew -- a series of desperate messages, asking if he knew how to drum and whether or not he would be willing to take two weeks off of life to go on tour. Cheney responded soon after with a simple: "Yes."

Medford and Cheney's friendship evolved from their time spent on the road into something that she describes as intuitive, telepathic. At the time, Medford had been performing solo under the moniker IAN -- in honor of the nickname her skater friends gave her in high school -- and put out a self-recorded EP titled Have You Ever Loved Anything This Much. That year, she and Cheney enlisted bassist Damien Scalise, and IAN SWEET became a trio. Medford describes Cheney and Scalise as polar opposites that compliment one another; two charged forces that she mediates, forming a platonic balance that brought Medford stability at a time when she didn't have any.

While she was writing Shapeshifter, Medford's life was in turmoil. She ended an emotionally abusive relationship in Boston, graduated from Berklee College of Music, and briefly moved home to the San Fernando Valley, thinking she would stay there. Medford was unsure of the band's future and suffering from a severe, undiagnosed panic disorder. When she returned to Boston to record the album in July of 2015 alongside Cheney and Scalise, Medford was reminded of everything she'd hoped to escape after graduation. She felt stagnant; trudging through a quicksand made up of heartbreak and severe depression, a process she references on Shapeshifter stand-out "Slime Time Live."

That's one of many lighthearted, nostalgic references on the album that subvert the pain beneath. Like its title suggests, most of the songs on Shapeshifter don't settle in a particular scene so much as they delve into a sensibility. Whether Medford's singing about Slime Time Live, eating ice cream in bed on "All Skaters Go To Heaven," or honoring her favorite athlete Michael Jordan on "#23," Medford displaces loneliness by falling in love with the small things that make her happy; like skateboarding, basketball, candy, and her preferred footwear: Crocs.

Accompanied by Cheney and Scalise's playful instrumentation, Shapeshifter becomes a celebratory purging, an album that finds humor in self-deprecation and vice. IAN SWEET's debut interrogates capital-e Existence through a candy-coated lens, their mathy precision scaffolding the chaos of Medford's personal neurosis and turning those anxieties into something hook-laden and relatable.

And though the narrative of Shapeshifter clings to an ex-lover, the yearning felt on this album isn't directed at a particular individual so much as it's turned inward.

"You know the feeling. When you really like someone, you forget to do anything for yourself, you forget all of the things that gave you your shape," Medford says. "The things that form your absolute."

On Shapeshifter, IAN SWEET prove that there is no one absolute; just the ease that comes with knowing everything will be OK as long as you hold tight to the pocket-sized things in life that bring happiness while you watch the rest of your world fall apart in slow-motion.
Dick Stusso
Dick Stusso
Dick Stusso, born out of failure and contempt for modern life, rises to become everything he despises."

On November 6th, 2015, Vacant Stare Records released Bay Area swinger Dick Stusso's first physical, musical release, Nashville Dreams/Sings the Blues. Imagine a drunk, unsuccessful Elvis, recording himself entirely alone and at home. The albums, recorded using different malfunctioning recording equipment, play like the two part saga of of a midnight cowboy, frustrated and paralyzed at the gates of a career driven world.

Dick's inimitable singing voice and his range of musical capabilities make this a very well constructed collection of songs that manages to keep its sense of humour. At times he seems to be poking fun at himself. The songs become a sort of self effigy turned party mascot he can kick around and set fire to. Light hearted charm is curbed by cynicism owed to an underlying awareness of man's mortality. Yet, all in all, Dick is able to sidestep becoming morose, giving us moments of happily getting drunk in the backyard and being barefoot on the porch as well as some hopeful love songs set somewhere off into the sunset.
-Grace Cooper
Guest MC - Seth Bogart
Guest MC - Seth Bogart
Venue Information:
Chop Suey
1325 E Madison St
Seattle, WA, 98122
http://www.chopsuey.com/