SOLD OUT - La Luz

The First Annual Tenth Anniversary Extravaganza Night 1

SOLD OUT - La Luz

Colleen Green, Dude York, Guest MC - Tacocat

Thu · May 18, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$18.00 - $20.00

This event is all ages

La Luz
La Luz
For most, a brush with death would be cause for retreat, reflection, and reluctance, but Seattle band La Luz found something different in it: resilience. Having survived a high-speed highway collision shortly after releasing their 2013 debut LP It's Alive, La Luz, despite lasting trauma, returned to touring with a frequency and tirelessness that put their peers to shame. Over the past year-and-a-half of performing, the band arrived at a greater awareness of their music's ability to whip eager crowds into a frenzy. In response, frontwoman Shana Cleveland's guitar solos took on a more unhinged quality. The basslines (from newly-installed member Lena Simon) became more lithe and elastic. Stage-dives and crowd-surfing grew to be as indelible a part of the La Luz live experience as their onstage doo-wop-indebted dance moves.

When it came time to record Weirdo Shrine, their second album—due out August 7th—the goal was to capture the band's restless live energy and commit it to tape. In early 2015, Cleveland and Co. adjourned to a surf shop in San Dimas, California where, with the help of producer/engineer Ty Segall, they realized this vision. Tracking most of the album live in shared quarters, La Luz chose to leave in any happy accidents and spur-of-the-moment flourishes that occurred while recording. Cleveland's newly fuzzed-up guitar solos—which now incorporated the influence of Japanese Eleki players in addition to the twang of American surf and country—were juxtaposed against the group's most angelic four-part harmonies to date. The organs of Alice Sandahl and the drumming of Marian Li Pino were granted extra heft and dimension. Thematically, Cleveland channeled Washingtonian poet Richard Brautigan on "You Disappear" and "Oranges," and sought
inspiration from Charles Burns' Seattle-set graphic novel Black Hole.

The resulting album is a natural evolution of the band's self-styled "surf noir" sound—a rawer, turbo-charged sequel that charts themes of loneliness, infatuation, obsession and death across eleven tracks, from the opening credits siren song of "Sleep Till They Die" to the widescreen, receding-skyline send-off of "Oranges" and its bittersweet epilogue, "True Love Knows."

In describing Weirdo Shrine, Segall remarked that it gave him a vision of a "world…burning with colors [he'd] never seen, like mauve that is living." In "Oranges," the Brautigan poem which inspired the aforementioned track of the same name, the poet writes of a surreal "orange wind / that glows from your footsteps." These hue-based
allusions are apt: the sound of La Luz is (appropriately) vibrant, and alive with a kaleidoscopic passion. Weirdo Shrine finds them at their most saturated and cinematic.
Colleen Green
Colleen Green
Growing up.


As a prospect it can be terrifying, sad, and worst of all, inevitable. But on I Want to Grow Up, her second album for Hardly Art, Colleen Green lets us know that we don't have to go it alone.


This latest collection of songs follows a newly 30-year-old Green as she carefully navigates a minefield of emotion. Her firm belief in true love is challenged by the inner turmoil caused by entering modern adulthood, but that doesn't mean that her faith is defeated. With a nod to her heroes, sentimental SoCal punks The Descendents, Green too wonders what it will be like when she gets old. Throughout songs such as "Some People," "Deeper Than Love," and the illustrative title track, the listener has no choice but to feel the sympathetic growing pains of revelatory maturation and the anxieties that come along with it.


Sonically the album is a major change for the LA-based songwriter, who has come to be known for her homemade recordings and merchandise. Her past offerings have been purely Green; testaments to her self-sufficiency and, perhaps, trepidation. This time, she's got a little help from her friends: the full band heard here includes JEFF the Brotherhood's Jake Orrall and Diarrhea Planet's Casey Weissbuch, who collaborated with Green over ten days at Sputnik Sound in Nashville, TN.


I Want to Grow Up is an experience, not unlike life: questioning, learning, taking risks. And in true CG fashion, a quote from a beloved 90s film seems the perfect summation: "Understanding is reached only after confrontation."
Dude York
Dude York
In the summer of 2014, pop enthusiasts Dude York changed. When their workspace was in use one afternoon, practice moved to singer and guitarist Peter Richards' apartment, where they shared with each other a handful of songs in progress. Bassist and singer Claire England shared one of hers for the first time, and Peter and drummer Andrew Hall were immediately, viscerally moved by what they heard. Everything was reframed in seconds; if Dude York was once solely a vehicle for Peter's energy, and one in which he was its main character, it suddenly became a true collaboration, a neverending venture between the three of them with stops along the way in DIY spaces, makeshift studios, and anywhere else it led. "Love Is" and "Lose Control" are the first in a series of singles to be released this winter and documented evidence of this growth.

Change was something they desperately needed. A year of obsessive writing and recording became a means by which to stay sane in the wake of lost friends, visceral mood swings, and the feeling of being an active participant in destructive repetition. A job spent analyzing thousands of hours of recorded music left Peter desensitized by the tropes and conventions of songs as he once knew them, but he found beauty in pop equilibrium. Writing with new insight and clarity in mind, more collaboratively than ever before, and in an attempt to create forward motion in the face of a series of disasters, the songs that emerged hit everywhere at once.

Claire describes "Love Is," her anthemic side of the single, as an exploration into the boundaries between self-care and self-immolation: "It's about the balance between turning experiences into art and the line one crosses when realizing someone's a person and a participant in your stories as much as you are in theirs'." "Lose Control," Peter's side, is a whisper into the ear of a driver swerving into oncoming traffic, a death-drive post-punk daydream.
Guest MC - Tacocat
Guest MC - Tacocat
Venue Information:
Chop Suey
1325 E Madison St
Seattle, WA, 98122
http://www.chopsuey.com/